Agneta Werner

Billedkunstner

agnetawerner@netscape.net

Toldbodgade 15 A, 3.tv.
1253 København K
Denmark

Tlf: 3314 8151

KUNSTNERPORTAL / MEDLEMSLISTE
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Æ
Ø
Å
    Værker
    • CV
    • Mere info

    Agneta Werner

    Billedkunstner

    Born 1952 in Malmö, Sweden. 

    Has lived and worked in Copenhagen, Denmark since 1979.

    Studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Copenhagen, Denmark 1979-85, 1988-90.

     

    First solo show 1982

    First group show 1988

     

     

    Further photographic documentation can be seen in the retrospective book:

    Agneta Werner  – the past

    ISBN 978-87-993015-1-5

    published 2009, in cooperation with North, Nørregade 7C, kld.,

    DK-1165 Copenhagen K. Denmark

     

    Essays by Mette Sandbye and Kristine Kern, translation Susan Dew

     

    Dansk tekst nedenunder

     

     

    “The chance encounter…”

    Agneta Werner’s photographic work

     

     

    METTE SANDBYE 

     

    “Art should be as beautiful as the chance encounter between a sewing machine and an umbrella on a dissecting table.” Thus runs the famous dictum of the French writer Comte de Lautréamont (the pseudonym of Isidore Ducasse). In his 1869 long prose poem Les Chants de Maldoror, he proposed a new ideal of beauty in art that would later be adopted and immortalized by the Surrealists in 1920s Paris.  And make no mistake, the aesthetic ideal projected by the poem, whose themes are eroticism, life and death, could scarcely be less romantic or idyllic. To quote the opening line of the verse that concludes with the famous pronouncement cited above: “He is as handsome as the retractibility of the claws of a bird of prey.” For the Surrealists, Lautréamont’s insight was spot-on: assemble a spread of familiar, everyday, but not contiguous or related objects or images in a montage or collage, and the senses will respond to the sheer off-kilterness of it, with new meanings emerging. Death and life, dreams and nightmares, eroticism and quotidianity, imagination and concrete sensuousness, randomness and control combine to create wholly new constellations. It wasn’t a case of exhibiting the world’s absurd unintelligibility so much as pointing up new and hitherto undiscovered potentialities in reality as it is: hence the label ‘sur-realism’.

    It would perhaps be inappropriate to dub Agneta Werner a Surrealist – not least because the term is associated with a specific historical period spanning the 1920s to the 40s. However, some of the means deployed by Werner in realizing her works recall those of the Surrealists, with collage or montage techniques playing a dominant role. Her devices include throwing splashes of coloured light across her pieces, as in “Elle saigne avec massepain rose” (1985), cutting up prints or negatives, sandwiching them with parts of other prints and scratching the film’s emulsion, as in another early piece, “Modus Vivendi”, juxtaposing ‘straight’, unmanipulated photos, a concept intrinsic to the making of “Ladies” (2001), and slapping a printed legend that reads “Activity Report. No. anonymous” onto a photograph of a semi-naked woman with a child in her arms, as she does in “fordable” (1994).

     

    Scores for multiple media

    Agneta Werner works with photography, video, text, sound and a range of performance-type strategies. The majority of her pieces consist of a variety of components which, in Lautréamont-esque style, are juxtaposed in arresting ways, conjuring novelty. Some of these components are drawn from the realms of the homely, the everyday: an old family photo, a china figurine, familiar perhaps from a grandparent’s mantelpiece, lemons or strawberries, a photograph of a house front in the provinces. Other elements read as staged: posed women’s bodies, for instance; or as sculptural or ‘painterly’ elaborations: draped fabric, string, colour filters, scratchings, writing.  However, one of the constants in Werner’s work is that these at once recognizably ordinary and yet quirkily staged elements combine in a single image.       

    Moreover, these collage compositions can be seen as offering the viewer a musical score that he or she can ‘play’ in seeking out meaning. For in Werner’s oneiric, richly suggestive pieces, meanings are never given beforehand. There are no pre-set solutions, no definitive stories to be deciphered.

    Strong affinities exist between the artist’s video pieces and her photographs; from the experimental, open-ended exploration of the play of meaning between images and words through to the use of intense, contrasting colours, posed female figures, fragmented body parts, still-life objects of plastic, plasticine, fruit, and the like.  Werner has also explored and experimented with the juxtaposition of image and text in her 1991 ”Allodium” – a challenging, visually experimental ‘artist’s book’, featuring drawings, lyrical or narrative fragments of English text, old archive photos, video stills and staged colour photomontages.

    Whether making a video, compiling a book or producing a photographic still, Werner’s working method is essentially the same. But in the present context, our focus will be on the photography, which constitutes the core of her oeuvre.

     

    The undergraduate years

    Born in Malmö in 1952, Agneta Werner has lived in Denmark since 1979, when she began her studies at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. Graduating in 1985, she returned to the academy in 1988-90 to earn a postgraduate degree in art theory. Initially studying painting at the academy, Werner soon switched to sculptural installations, and her sense of sculptural form would manifest itself later in her photography.

    In 1981, Werner created the land art project “Spor” [Traces] in collaboration with two fellow students, Ewa Jacobsson and Mads Madsen. The project involved the creation of red, blue, yellow and green fabric strips, 4 km long and 8cm wide, which would be draped across two generically different areas: along a route in the capital, from Fælledparken (a public park in Copenhagen) to Frederiksberg cemetery, and in two trackless, untrodden sites in the natural realm, a cliff top site at Stevns Cliff and a snow-clad Grib Forest.  By means of this low-profile intervention, the artists indirectly challenged themselves and passers-by to think about whether, and if so how, our immediate environment and regular beat are transformed or, alternatively, just marginally impacted, by a modest piece of ‘tweaking’. This performative-sculptural and, in formal terms, fairly minimal intrusion into the public realm was in fact scaled down by the Copenhagen police, who opposed its implementation between the two streets of Aaboulevarden and Rosenørns Allé. But although the artists were thus prevented from commandeering the entire pre-planned route, the most important aspect was naturally the experimental intervention itself – the formal modification of everyday urban space. The trio then came up with the idea of extending the project into the natural realm, unfurling the strips of fabric to create a time-limited land art project. After it had been photographed, it was removed.

    Agneta Werner’s first solo show was held in the Royal Danish Academy’s exhibition space Rådskælderen the following year. The viewer might have been forgiven for initially seeing only empty spaces, but then he or she would notice a host of spatial ‘infiltrations’ mediated by a few simple small objects. The artist’s interventions included the introduction of 400 unpainted tin soldiers in formation, a plastic bluebottle mounted on the wall with the legend ‘made in Hongkong’ on one of its wings, two hexagonal-shaped pillars, a sharp little red triangular shape jutting out from the wall and, on the floor, a Polaroid photo of an angel sculpture with a flame beneath it, caused by the use of the wrong exposure. The installational montage piece which lets ”umbrellas and sewing machines” meet on ”a dissecting table” is, then, already implicit in these early pieces, even though, from a formal perspective, they are more sculptural and spatially interventionist in character than Werner’s later works. 

    Within a few years, Werner had begun working exclusively with photography and video, producing lyrical, associative montage series such as “Elle saigne avec massepain rose” [She bleeds with pink marzipan] (1985), “MODUS VIVENDI” (1987), “streaming Deaths” (1987), “IDENTIFICATION” (1988) and the two series that, right down to the titles, are her most ‘still life-ish’, “she was still life/reconstructing sense” (1990) and “pretending still life/off Her sense” (1991). These latter two pieces reprise elements of Werner’s debut exhibition: the tin soldiers, the colour palette, the deployment of already existing photographs from her extensive archive and, not least, her conjurings with a diversity of objects and sensuous elements, playing them off and against each other. In the series ”pretending still life/off Her sense”, the photomontages are not the result of the physical manipulation of the material, such as for example, cutting and scratching negatives and prints (her preferred artistic method in the early years). Instead, Werner assembled tableaux or still lifes on a table, photographing them without manipulation. In these tableaux, where other photos are used as background, the superimposition of a diversity of objects (a lemon, a flayed plaice, a plastic knight on horseback, some piles of pigment) allows her to juggle scale and depth in the seemingly oneiric and fairytale style photographic landscapes. And just as in the fairytale classics, Grimms´ Fairy Tales, for example, so too here there is the sense of an ominous or menacing undertow lurking beneath an apparent romantic idyll.

    The title “Elle saigne avec massepain rose” could have come straight from a 1920s Surrealist film by Salvador Dali and Luis Bunuel. The piece features a photograph of a Royal Copenhagen china figurine of a little shepherd boy, a posed photograph of the artist herself in a splendid silk ball gown, holding a china bird figurine, and a pink-tinted photograph of a woman in a negligee. Once again, it is left entirely to the viewer to construct his or her own Surrealist ‘film’ out of these disconnected elements, rich in allusion to classic Surrealist motifs such as desire, femininity, fragility and dreams.

     

    A totally different kind of colour photography

    It was the practice of documenting her time-limited installational pieces and shows photographically that led Agneta Werner to turn to photography as an artistic medium; the realization dawned that photography harboured potentials that she was keen to exploit. In the beginning, her approach was what she herself has called an ‘anti-photographic attitude’ to photography, and to the preciousness and deference surrounding the technical aspects of the medium that dominated art photography as she perceived it. So for her, it was imperative that photographs be manipulated, disfigured, cut, painted over, scratched and reduced to something intrinsically physical, somewhat on a par with the materialities of painting and sculpture.  Along the way, however, she came increasingly to appreciate the specifically ‘photographic’ aspects of the medium, as well as the sense of vacuity and absence that imbues pure documentary photography, using it to good effect in her more recent series.    

    The years immediately following graduation were marked by a tremendous zest for creativity: Agneta Werner worked with both video and photo collages, the one cross-pollinating the other. In 1985, she had a solo show at Galleri Kongo, Copenhagen, which was followed, in 1987, by solo shows at Galleri Lång in Malmö, Sweden, and Galleri Basilisk in Copenhagen. And then again in Sweden in 1989 at Galleri Monica Benbasat in Norrköping. But it was perhaps above all her participation in the Charlottenborg Autumn Exhibition (Copenhagen) in 1990 that resulted in the Danish art scene taking serious note of her individual idiom, at a time when few artists did large format photography. In this exhibition, she showed four large colour photographs from the series “IDENTIFICATION I-VI”. These pieces struck a new note in Danish photography, for while the images are arguably reminiscent of international trends in staged photography in the late 80s, recalling names such as Barbara Kruger, Boyd Webb, Sandy Skoglund and Cindy Sherman, the montage aspect in itself sufficed to set them apart. And in a Danish context, their monumental scale (two by three metres), the ultra high-tech finish and glossy, laminated surfaces were enough to ensure that they stood out. The shiny, saturated Ilfochrome Classic colours and the montage of a diversity of random-looking image fragments evoked a potent yet elusive dreaminess and lyricism. 

    Close inspection of this series reveals Agneta Werner’s trademark stylistic traits. The use of brilliant contrasting colours in one and the same picture. Small plastic or china figurines, of animals for instance, which, while kitschy and banal, recall the viewer’s own remembered spaces, the nursery and the stories heard in childhood, a grandparent’s living room with its china figurines. The inset female body parts. These pictures consist of what is a virtually abstract photographic background overlaid with more straightforwardly legible pictorial fragments. These include a woman’s ear and hair, detached from the rest of the body and mounted on a blurry, greenish background. On a blue ground in another picture in the series, an ear and a detached arm – both red – float free. With the image of parted, scarlet-lipsticked sensual lips, the overall combination of sensuousness, eeriness, kitsch and visual playfulness, and indeed, in the choice of motifs – the mouth and the severed ear – the montage recalls the world of David Lynch’s film Blue Velvet, which had premiered a couple of years previously. In a third, there is a flautist, a child’s hand and a woman’s face. Clipped-in stripes, which look like bubbly blue water but are in fact made from photographed colour pigments, break up the otherwise complementarily coloured red-green background photograph. While there’s the hint of a narrative, a disturbing interplay between the complementary colours and the literally severed motivic elements renders the picture seductive, sensuous and aesthetically compelling. Werner manages to highlight both depth and surface at once, in part because the montage elements, often deliberately clunkily mounted, stand out conspicuously, but also because she frequently achieves complex perceptual effects through the use of contrasting colours or hard and soft materials in the sculptural still lifes featured in many of the photographs.

    “Unknowns” (1996) is a case in point. It consists of three large-scale friezes designed by Agneta Werner as Gothic ‘window sections’ and mounted on wooden structures in front of Sct Matthæus [St Matthew’s] church in Copenhagen as part of the group show City Space, exhibited in the public realm during Copenhagen’s year as European City of Culture. The overarching title for Werner’s installation was “Circumstance for sore eyes”. Inside the church, the three windows facing out onto the installation were blocked out, while the mounted photographs themselves – in shape, scaled-up replicas of the arched church windows – figured as alfresco exemplars of contemporary, more secularly-slanted window mosaics. Each frieze consists of three photographs, one above the other. Sparkling imitation diamonds juxtaposed with white foam rubber shapes and white lace; photographed religious iconography in a plaster relief frieze jostling with plastic beads; tufts of coloured cotton wool floating like lowering clouds over hard materials such as a plastic box, wire, a photo of a plaster knight and a plastic pig – and the whole reflecting Werner’s characteristic palette of bright red, yellow, green and blue, the vivid colours used in stained glass church windows. 

     

    Collisions of meaning, chains of meaning 

    In Werner’s montages, which, since they read as still lifes (as noted, some of their titles advertise them as such), figure as the free-form continuation of a centuries-old art tradition, the diverse elements converse among themselves in a non-narrative, perceptually dynamic yet indefinable way. While the large formats annex both the space and the viewer’s attention, their lack of immediate legibility tends to keep the viewer at arm’s length. Moreover, the artist enlists language as a creative co-player, inasmuch as the picture titles and sometimes words or sentences printed directly onto the photographs open up for fresh connotations.  But instead of providing any kind of semantic anchor, the words remain curiously cryptic, investing the picture with a particular mood. Examples include lyrical visual titles such as “Elle saigne avec massepain rose” and “lavenderblood”, and titles with an archival ring to them, such as ”identification” and ”dokumentindsigt” [right of access to documents], as two series are dubbed, or “Part services. Activity Report, No. anonymous”, which is the inscription on the “royalty” sequence.

    The series “royalty” (1992-94) consists of three compositions, four to six metres in length. Each features an obscure collision of meanings between, on the one hand, an old, blurred holiday-style snap combined with what are presumably film stills, which somehow contrive to spark imaginary film sequences in the viewer, and, on the other, individual objects, captured in the sharp focus used in advertisements. One member of the trio, “evoke”, features on the left of the picture a clutch of yellow flowers on a sheeny blue surface with a fabric flower in amongst them – suggestive, perhaps, of the body of a dead woman. At the centre is a grainy holiday snap of a woman sitting on rocks, looking at the photographer, and on the right a lusciously photographed swatch of fabric overlaid with an architectural photograph. The banal, private, memory-triggering items, the touristy snaps of the woman, the base of the Eiffel tower, the children on the beach and St Mark’s Square in Venice cohere into tightly structured compositions. The trivial and the dramatic, lyrical exuberance and formal rigour, kitsch and cool are simultaneously in play throughout. Indeed, the viewer is both seduced and captivated by the images, despite registering a slight impatience at the absence of any clearly articulated narrative. Agneta Werner uses similar strategies in her video and film production, one example being the video “Coven, one placement” (1996), where, in a protracted, unmoving sequence, the viewer discerns three camels in an Arab urban setting. The shot is momentarily intercut now and again with images imbued with an entirely different aesthetic and drawn from an antithetical universe. The soundscape switches between monotonous computer music, the ambient sounds of an Arab setting and a disconnected monologic narrative delivered by a female voice-over in English.

     

    Circumstantial evidence

    Beginning with the 1998 photographic series “dokumentindsigt”, first shown at Gentofte Art Library and later as part of the major solo exhibition Tilfald [Forefall] at Overgaden in Copenhagen in 1999, Werner tones down the sculptural and performative tableau elements and the manipulation of materials in favour of a straight-up montage, photographs mounted side by side but as discrete prints. While some of the early still-life photographs feature a hugger-mugger of objects, from plastic soldiers to raw fish, odd sentence fragments and little blasts of colour, the aesthetic inflecting the most recent series is, by contrast, understated and taut.  The series “dokumentindsigt” juxtaposes utterly bland elements: anonymous photos of a boring Swedish provincial town, which at a stroke – abetted by the quasi-legal-procedural title – acquire circumstantial evidence-style status. (The same could be said of the French photographer Eugène Atget’s Paris photographs from the early twentieth century.) So sharply focused are Werner’s prints that we can make out something tossed onto the grass – refuse, clothing, or is it a bag? The street name “Lotsgatan” is clearly legible on a tiny road sign far in the background of another picture. These images are juxtaposed with deliberately chosen drab interiors, furnished with 1950-60s furniture: a stool upholstered in a brown weave on a brown striped runner carpet, and an open, laminated teak door, or, as in one of her characteristically taut, formal still-life compositions: an oval picture frame and two plush balls in garish colours on a flat, searing red background. Werner refers to the pictures as dossiers, and it is indeed as if the viewer were being granted a peek into documents relating to an unresolved crime that the photograph on its own has no chance whatever of unravelling. The ‘case’ only opens up in the encounter between image and viewer. The large-scale formats, crisp images and Cibachrome’s starkly contrasting colours virtually suck the viewer into the pictures; but at the same time, Agneta Werner conjures with the vacuity of photography, and in so doing makes an important statement about the medium’s orchestration of presence and absence. 

    The theme of circumstantial evidence recurs in the series ”Ladies” (2001) and ”fra Erindringsbalken” [from the Memory beam], (2004). ”Ladies” comprises three photographs, each of which features a portrait of a named woman – Gun, Siv and Majken, respectively – and a house.  Wearing print fabrics, often with floral designs, the women were photographed against a backdrop of patterned wallpaper, which, despite their unsmiling countenances, gives the portraits a vibrant and vivid feel. Set among exotic palms, the white wooden houses, redolent of the American South, seem somewhat at odds with the Swedish names of the portraitees. In contrast to the women, the houses are photographed from some distance away. And since they look uninhabited, and give the impression of providing a mysterious, cinematic, indeed, mildly eerie counterpoint to the women, the viewer is prodded into constructing imaginary scenarios to connect woman and house. The women were photographed in winter, in natural daylight, with a resulting soft effect, while the houses were photographed in bright light with the lens stopped down slightly, which serves to heighten the vaguely ominous atmosphere.

    The series ”fra Erindringsbalken” is a sequence of individual photographs created for an exhibition in the Danish national broadsheet Politiken’s lobby space in 2006. The series exemplifies how Werner’s titles suggest rather than prescribe meaning. The Swedish word ‘balk’ designates both a load-bearing construction element – a beam – and also the main sections of Sveriges Rikes Lag, the Swedish constitution. In Old Danish, the word signifies a partition wall, a field boundary or a beam, and was also used as a designation for the sections of the old Nordic laws. These connotations link up into a notion of memory’s intrinsic substrate or supporting structure. The compact, simply composed photographs are mainly of individual objects shot against a monochrome background and include a silver cake spatula, a fragment of a gilded cherub, a lace tablecloth, a swatch of sumptuous yellow silk. While the images read as objective archival-style photographs, the colour palette – not least the searing red, yellow and blue – and sharply depicted texture of the lustrous fabrics, the silver’s reflective surface and the fine filigree of the lace conjure a richly sensuous confrontation with the ‘cool’ photographic medium.

    The flat, monochrome surfaces upon which Werner has placed these ‘objects of memory’ are perhaps what come closest to Lautréamont’s dissecting table. Here the sewing machine and the umbrella are transmuted into the cake spatula and the Christmas cherub, but the staged ”chance” encounter between these materials, surfaces and forms articulates a peculiar beauty that would surely have earned an appreciative nod from both Lautréamont and the Surrealists.

     

     

    translation Susan Dew

     

     

     

     

     

    Illusions have to be offered1

    - on Agneta Werner’s film and video production

     

     

    KRISTINE KERN

     

    ”Narration is never an evident given of images, or the effect of a structure which underlies them; it is a consequence of the visible images themselves, of the perceptible images in themselves, as they are initially defined for themselves.”2

    Gilles Deleuze

    A distinctive poetic aesthetic informs many of Agneta Werner’s pieces. It is as though the individual elements have been put together like the words of a poem, the only difference being that Werner’s language is visual. She creates a visual syntax, a narrative of images. However, unlike many literary narratives, her pieces have no clear-cut storyline. And given, too, the abstract character and opacity of Werner’s narratives, it becomes difficult to say what they are essentially about. 

     

    A journey across time

    Images from a diversity of localities intermingle and migrate from one projection to the next in Agneta Werner’s video installation “Tender southern journey”. We are in Stockholm, Berlin and Elsinore – in urban settings, museums and elsewhere. Asynchronous narratives spin out across time and space. Some elements recur, however; one such motif is the horse, which appears in a variety of guises. The soundscape is vibrant, dynamic. Real sound, classical music and voice-overs combine to produce the cacophony characteristic of urban environments. Predictably, in Werner’s pieces, the sounds are manipulated: some are amplified, others muted, some are ‘found’, others constructed. The overall effect is to bring out the kinesis inherent in the self-displacing images presented in the installation’s three projections.

    In terms of the way the video is shot and subsequently screened in a darkened room, the piece has the character of a film, albeit that all linear, filmic narrative is in abeyance. As is so often the case with Werner, narrative is merely implied, it being left to the viewer to piece the fragments together to construe meaning. At the same time, however, the exhibition setting tends to undercut a filmic interpretation. When the moving images of “Tender southern journey” leave the obscurity of the cinema to be displayed as part of an art show, entering into dialogue with other works, they also enter into a new relationship with the viewer, who becomes involved in a processual interaction with the installation: circulating in the same shared space, he or she gets to relate physically to the piece’s sculptural dimensions.3

    “Tender southern journey” was first displayed as part of the show Tide in the exhibition space Møstings Hus in Frederiksberg, Copenhagen in 2007, where videos from the installation “Position of the cycles” and the video piece “The lonesome cowboy journey” were also shown.

     

    An early experimental approach

    Agneta Werner’s filmic practice can be seen as tracing a path from experimental film to video installation, from the staged to the documentary. To approach Agneta Werner’s video pieces through just one of several possible optics, we glance back to the beginning. Agneta Werner’s oeuvre is not limited to film and video;  photography too forms a key part of her output, and indeed she began at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in the early 1980s by working with installation. The trajectory from installation to photography, film and later video art was essentially propelled by an interest in documentary photography. When Agneta Werner came to document exhibitions such as ”Utan titel” [Untitled], realized in collaboration with Ewa Jacobsson and shown at Gallery (1) in Stockholm in 1982, she found herself increasingly grabbed by the photography itself. She began working with staged photography, and has stayed with it ever since.

     

    Images of women

    In her solo show ”Elle saigne avec massepain rose” at the exhibition space Kongo, Copenhagen in 1985, Werner presented her first photographic/film installation. The show comprised six large-scale images mounted directly on the wall, two folding chairs and a trolley-mounted monitor. The photographs, depicting china figurines and women in slightly dated evening finery, were highly theatrical and shadow-steeped, the use of coloured light and filters strongly in evidence. The 14-minute, Super 8 experimental film “Warty heaven”, which depicts a woman on the seashore, is leisurely paced, almost lingering, while at the same time flickering, jerky and galvanizing. Here Werner’s focus is the relationship between image and word/sound. On the visual side, there is a dichotomy between the fixed  camera position and the deliberately abrupt cutting, while in terms of the soundscape, there is a disjunct between the gentle pace of the voice-over and the shrill, somewhat irritating rings/squeaks audible at varying volume levels throughout the film. Although it opens with the line “Oh God, the handsome Prince was expected”, there is little that smacks of fairytale in this fragmented, off-kilter narrative. The woman is seen both in profile and full view, naked and slowly rotating on her axis. There is a shot of the surf and a woman’s feet at the water’s edge. The image is red. Evidently, a filter has been used. We see the sea, and gulls in the sky. Black branches and bats are silhouetted against a night blue background. Towards the end of the video a white swan appears against the unnaturally red-tinctured sea. Finally, the image fades, dissolving into orange. “So it was…”.   The absence of a dominant thread, or indeed even a clear thread, running through the narrative suggests an oneiric universe, where remembered fragments of dreams transgress into reality. And yet the film has more structure than a dream. The same vaguely brooding – in Freud’s terminology, unheimliche – atmosphere is pervasive throughout. As is the feminine focus – a theme that recurs throughout Agneta Werner’s oeuvre. So perhaps the piece is  an exploration of female identity that involves the depiction of the feminine in the public arena of film. No clear-cut answers are forthcoming.

    “Patricia the pearl” (1988) was Agneta Werner’s first video recorded on U-matic tape. If anything, its theme is even more enigmatic than that of “Warty heaven”. Werner herself describes the video as a “visual narrative and a monotonous voice [which] together form a transparent black hole”.4 And yet clues are laid out. In terms of content, the video revolves around feminine sensibility, while, formally, the movement of the camera is the lynchpin. In contrast to “Warty heaven”, which was shot with a fixed camera, “Patricia, the pearl” is marked by constant panning and zooming. The filmed objects, however, are motionless: an arrangement of motley objects on a table, with a Super 8 film and slides projected onto two white surfaces in the background of the set-up.  Even though “Patricia, the pearl” is a video piece, it has very much the feel of an experimental film: tentative and probing in its idiom, surreal in its content.  A close look at other pieces produced by Agneta Werner at this time reveals patent affinities with photographic series such as “Modus Vivendi, sonett i elva akter” [Modus Vivendi, sonnet in eleven acts], “streaming Deaths” (both from 1987) and “IDENTIFICATION I – VI” from 1988. These pieces too involve the use of fragmented elements and collage techniques, as well as the woman as a recurring figure. 

    In her 1973 essay “Visual Pleasure and the Narrative Cinema”, the film theorist and feminist Laura Mulvey formulates a psychoanalytic framework of filmic interpretation. Her focus is the representation of women in classic Hollywood cinema as passive role models. She writes, inter alia:

    “In a world ordered by sexual imbalance, pleasure in looking has been split between active/male and passive/female. The determining male gaze projects its fantasy onto the female figure, which is styled accordingly. In their traditional exhibitionist role women are simultaneously looked at and displayed, with their appearance coded for strong visual and erotic impact so that they can be said to connote to-be-looked-at-ness.”5

     

    This issue identified by Mulvey in the context of Hollywood films is deconstructed in Agneta Werner’s work. Here women are depicted in a fragmented fashion, straight or staged, but at no point does Werner appropriate the full-blown feminine stereotype routinely produced by Hollywood. Instead, we encounter a feminine gaze, a perspective given even sharper focus in Werner’s videos from around 1990.

     

    Performance

    While both “Warty heaven” and “Patricia, the pearl” are dark narratives, the late 1980s saw a lightening of Werner’s palette in the 22-minute long “Goats of glory” (1989). Here four different women appear in turn in a virtually all-white space, sometimes naked, sometimes clothed. We see them in full view and in close-up. As fragments of a larger narrative, these close-ups act as reference points, while also having their own intrinsic value as images with stories inherent in them in the manner of Surrealist paintings. The absurd, manipulated and contrived aspects of the narratives are reinforced by the occasional manipulation of the video image to almost painterly effect. Collage, cut-up and short clipped-in sequences are all devices used by Werner that reinforce the piece’s experimental film feel. At the same time, there are references to classical Egyptian and Greek art, as well as more general art-historical references, such as the way in which some scenes are staged as natures mortes. Again, there are affinities with Agneta Werner’s photographic pieces from the same period. The photographic series “she was still life/reconstructing sense” and “pretending still life/off Her sense” from 1990 and 1991 respectively, also come off as still-life set-ups, with the titles advertising them as such. Although both pieces are experimental in style, “she was still life/reconstructing sense”, like “Goats of glory”, synthesizes a variety of formal devices, whereas “pretending still life /off Her sense” is more collage-like. Moreover, in the case of the first two, the female figure is a key element.

    Indeed, “Goats of glory” may be seen as a further engagement  with the theme of female identity that informs “Warty heaven” and “Patricia, the pearl”. While the two latter represent opposed strategies – stills contra moving figures, and staged set-ups contra the panning camera – “Goats of glory” deploys both. Moreover, the performance element conveys the impression that the piece  documents an actual event. But while it is inherently not a documentary, the fact that ‘the action’ comes across as genuine agency brings out the constructedness of the situation, or rather the fact that the representation of women is a construction. Pertinent here is the concept of gender formulated by the American literary critic Judith Butler in her Gender Trouble (1990), where she attacks the narrow, binary understanding of gender that divides people into male and female. On her view, gender is performative, which is to say it must continually constitute itself as (gender) identity via acts and social transactions within given cultural settings. And in a sense, that is what the women in several of Agneta Werner’s videos – not least in “Goats of glory” – do. They try out different, often extreme versions of female stereotypes, exploring them through a performative ‘putting oneself’ in the woman’s place.

     

    Cut-up

    “Courier”, a collaboration piece with the writer Christer Hermansson, and “Ohh!, so…”, both videos from 1990, share a number of features in common. Moreover, in terms of form and content they resonate with Agneta Werner’s previous film and video pieces, while both simplifying and radicalizing several of the formal devices used earlier. In “Courier” the image is split horizontally by a band of text, a narrative. On either side of it, against a blue ground, parts of faces are seen in profile – from the bridge of the nose to the chin. The two facial profiles (in fact, two exposures of the same face) are horizontal, turned towards each other, facing in opposite directions. The faces take turns in moving their lips languidly as if in slow motion. Every now and again, these images are briefly intercut with black-and-white sequences of horses (harness racing pacers). Then images of a bare breast above and an upwards-pointing finger beneath the band of text replace the faces. The music shifts from monotonous, quivering electro to a more invasive, insistent soundtrack. The process is repeated, but towards the end, two brief sequences showing a supine, naked woman,  are viewed through an orange filter, the music/sound briefly interrupted by a whistle. There is no obvious relationship between the narrative about a (drugs?) courier6 offered by the text and the video images. So whatever connections there may be are deliberately left to the viewer’s own associative powers.            

    In formal terms, “Ohh!, so…” is reminiscent of ”Courier”, the only difference being that the narrative thread is less clearly discernible. There is continual cross-cutting between a panning across a dark collage-like tableau featuring isolate human figures in a staged landscape setting, accompanied by the sound of breakers and, in contrast, the taut compositions of three hands or two hands and a foot ‘encased’ in three mobile, individually coloured stripes that span the length of the image plane. At intervals, a variety of onomatopoeic words such as “aef”, “cii”, “hva” and “uhx” scroll across the images and a repetitive electronic theme can be heard, not unlike that featured in “Courier”. The video is phantasmagoric and dream-like, making it difficult to pin down what it’s about. According to Agneta Werner, the aim was to “accommodate interspaces”.7 Both “Courier” and “Ohh!, so…” share an interest in random connections, and can be read as experimental explorations of what happens when image, text and sound are juxtaposed. The abrupt clips, collage effects and the interlinking of disparate elements are all formal devices that feed into the thrust of the videos as explorations of meaning.

    Werner’s 1991 book ”Allodium, she belonged to him”8 is also permeated by the kaleidoscopic play of cut-up techniques. Photographs, drawings and textual fragments interweave to create an asynchronous, fragmented narrative with no clear thrust. The artist has created a trajectory, however, providing clues to conjure with – a landscape of textual and visual associations wherein the reader can navigate. In terms of both form and content, ”Allodium” can be seen as a compendium of Agneta Werner’s pieces from the mid-1980s through to the early 90s – characterized by the same slightly dry sensuousness and developing several of the devices we have seen at work in both the videos and the photography, now in book object format. Moreover, ”Allodium” turned out to mark a watershed in Werner’s artistic practice.

     

    The return to the real

    While Agneta Werner’s films and videos from the mid- 1980s to the early 90s are highly staged, the mid-90s witnessed a striking shift. The 1996 “Coven, one placement” – despite having threads that go back to “Warty heaven” – is far more documentary in style. There is a slow panning of what look like Arab rooftops, silhouetted against the setting sun. These images, accompanied by urban sounds, soft Arab music and the like, frame the four-part visual epic, defining its mood and pace. The recurring sequence of images in all four parts features three silhouetted backlit camels – again, against a sun-red sky. The music changes, but not dramatically, and its meditative tone makes room for the natural sounds of the outdoors, along with sentence fragments spoken by the artist’s voice-over. The voice-over, together with the captions separating the various video segments, invests the images with ambiguity; the viewer just glimpses the outline of a narrative, of subtle relationships, without ever quite understanding what is going on. The sense of a wayward ambiguity is heightened by the ‘cutting in’ of black-and-white images that are unsettling in the stark counterpoint they pose to the slow pace of the video. These images are close-ups of miscellaneous items, such as a street section or a flower stalk. The aesthetic is altogether different, grainier, as though the footage had been shot surreptitiously. A certain ominousness, an underlying atmosphere of eeriness, pervades the video, an impression only amplified by the long-drawn out, almost enervating pace.9

    The video’s documentary style and idiom is key to the concept of the piece. It was no part of Agneta Werner’s intention to make a documentary, but the video’s formal affinities with the documentary tradition have implications for how it comes across. The notions of truth and objectivity that normally ‘adhere’ to a documentary rub off onto the video in virtue of its references to the documentary form, which here serves as a self-reflexive device through which the piece exposes its own contrivance.10

    “Coven, one placement” was originally produced for the sculpture exhibition City Space,11 as part of Werner’s contribution “Circumstance for sore eyes”. It was installed at Mattheus [St Matthew’s] Church in Vesterbro in Copenhagen. Unfortunately, only one element of the project was realized – the large billboard style photographs, “Unknowns”, erected outside the church. The video, intended for screening on a monitor inside the church at a point between the pulpit and the altar, was never realized. In its totality, the project would have activated not only the church’s surrounds but also its interior. “Coven, one placement” was shown for the first time as part of the exhibition Tilfald [Forefall] in the exhibition space Overgaden in 1999, a show with a retrospective slant since it dug deep into the artist’s oeuvre, juxtaposing older works with more recent pieces. The show also displayed the photo series “royalty” (1992 – 1994) in its entirety for the first time. This had not been possible previously for reasons of scale (the largest of the series’ three pictures is almost six metres long). And indeed, the piece cohered well with the more recent 1998 series “dokumentindsigt” [right of access to documents].

    The project “Circumstance for sore eyes” for which “Coven, one placement” was originally produced highlights an evolving aspect of Agneta Werner’s art, which, while having previously been an underlying element, now becomes more salient. It involves the adoption of an integrated approach whereby the specific installational scenario requirements are factored into the piece itself – sometimes early on in the process. 

     

    Post-production

    In the years immediately following “Coven, one placement”, Agneta Werner produced neither film nor video pieces. Instead, photographic series such as “dokumentindsigt”, the monumental “Ladies” (2001) and “fra Erindringsbalken” [from the Memory beam], (2004) defined this period. When Werner returned to video in 2002, she switched to digital format. Her first digital video was the unassuming piece “The lonesome cowboy journey” (2006), shot in the Deer park in Klampenborg, just north of Copenhagen. A woman on horseback  is tracked by the camera until she slowly rides out of shot. The video is very different from Agneta Werner’s earlier pieces inasmuch as it appears relatively unedited. There is no manipulation here, the six-minute long sequence is not even cut. The camera is merely moved from time to time to keep the rider in shot. The soundtrack, a short, snappy ‘cowboy tune’, a couple of gunshots and a few animal sounds are all that is added to the documentary footage. It is, however, the soundtrack and the title that flag up the artist’s intention with the work. Without these markers of meaning, the piece might be taken for a random documentary fragment. Both title and soundtrack highlight the cowboy angle, and by so doing draw attention to the fact that a woman is depicted in a role normally reserved to men: the lone cowboy, no less, who in every self-respecting western – his heroic exploits accomplished – rides off into the horizon and out of the film. Here, in contrast to Werner’s earlier videos, the various female stereotypes go unaddressed; instead the female protagonist steps into a male role. There is one element, however, that quite explicitly links the piece to several earlier pieces: the horse. As noted above, horses appear in a number of Agneta Werner’s videos, including, for instance “Patricia, the pearl” (in the voice-over), “Goats of glory”, “Courier” and, not least, “Tender southern journey”.

    “The lonesome cowboy journey” well illustrates Agneta Werner’s working method. She had in fact gone to the Deer Park to film deer, but in the process stumbled upon a far more interesting subject: the horsewoman.12 The video is thus a form of found material, a fortuitous shot that is subsequently enhanced and edited. As is often the case in her oeuvre, Werner starts off with a fragment and then feels her way forward, adding, taking away. She describes the process as one of juxtaposing disparate elements to see what (unpredictably) emerges. It is in the post-production process that meanings take form. 

    As previously noted, “The lonesome cowboy journey”13 formed part of the major video installation exhibition Tide, which Agneta Werner had at Møstings Hus towards the end of 2007. This was not the first time, however, that the artist worked in the medium of large-scale video installations.

     

    Towards a focus on installations

    The video pieces of recent years are very different from those of the 1980s and early 90s. Now, even more than previously, the videos are conceived within an installational framework, the exhibition space itself enlisted as an active co-player. This is well illustrated by the 2007 installation “Position of the cycles”, which, as part of the exhibition Navigation, was made specifically for the Aarhus Art Building’s octagonal-shaped space. The piece consists of four videos displayed on flat screens, inset into alternating walls. In the middle of the space, four benches were set, specially designed to respond to the diagonals of the space and the dimensions of the video screens. Each bench faced onto one of the videos. Headphones accompanied each screen,  allowing the viewer to ponder the individual elements in the installation while simultaneously taking it in in its entirety, noting the correlations unfolding between the several videos.

    The installation “Position of the cycles” consisted, as noted above, of four videos: “the likeness of a gull”, “countryside life”, “access to history” and “presentation of a witness”. Common to them all is their meditative, almost “boring”, quality. Each video presents an animal or several animals in short documentary sequences filmed using a fixed camera setting. In “the likeness of a gull” we follow the ‘action’ of a gull sitting on a pole in the water. The film ends when the gull flies off.14 In “presentation of a witness”, a coot is in focus, and in “countryside life” a horse lolls in a meadow, while the final member of the quartet, “access to history”, shows syrphid flies on a dog rose. This last is played in slow motion, but the leisurely pace made explicit here is in fact characteristic of all the videos. Even though the images are moving, and there’s a sense in which the ‘action’ advances, it is as if time is frozen in an eternal now. There is no narrative progression. In this, the videos are reminiscent of paintings, a feature also brought out by the mode of display:  the video images hang like paintings on the wall, with attendant benches in place allowing a contemplative engagement. Each of the quartet of videos making up “Position of the cycles” manifestly relates to the exhibition’s general theme of navigation but does so in a somewhat abstract and generalized manner, with navigation becoming a metaphor for simply being in the world.

    In returning to installational work and documentary making, Agneta Werner has adopted the premise of non-compliance with established filmic conventions. Formal experimentation remains a key element of her artistic practice, as does what we might – for want of a more adequate term – call the existential element. This latter comes to expression in certain recurring figures that have pervaded Werner’s oeuvre from the outset and do so still – horses and women pivotal among them. Along with the video installation “Tender southern journey”, also from 2007, “Position of the cycles” defined a new trajectory for Agneta Werner’s artistic discourse.          

     

     

    NOTES

    1 This is the closing line in “Patricia, the pearl,” 1988. 

    2 Gilles Deleuze: Cinema 2. The Time-Image, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 1989, p. 27

    3 See also my text “Mellem Billede og Bevægelse – om videokunst i udstillingssammenhæng” [Between Image and Movement – on video art in an exhibition setting] in Ramsing, M., (ed.), Dwellan, Charlottenborg Exhibition Building, Copenhagen, 2004.

    4 The quotation is taken from the artist’s Listing of Works.

    5 Laura Mulvey: ”Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema,” first published in Screen, Autumn 1975 and reprinted in her Visual and Other Pleasures, Palgrave, Basingstoke & New York, 1989, p. 19.

    6 The term ’courier’, one of whose senses is ‘guide’, is also a reference to the narrator, who guides us through the story.

    7 To cite from Agneta Werner’s Listing of Works: “Et logisk udskifte af tegn, tid og tålmodighed, for at imødekomme mellemrummet. Et eksperimenterende arbejde med billede og lyd.”  [A logical exchange of signs, time and patience to accommodate interspaces. An experimental piece involving image and sound.]

    8 ”Allodium” was Agneta Werner’s graduation project from the Department of Art Theory at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts.

    9 The above description of “Coven, one placement” is a slightly edited version of the text I wrote for the exhibition Tilfald at Overgaden in 1998, where the video piece, originally produced for City Space in 1996, was shown for the first time.

    10 See my article “Realitetsrepræsentationer – en undersøgelse af dokumentarisme i billedkunst “ [Representations of reality – a study of the use of the documentary medium in the visual arts] in the journal Periskop nr. 13, Samtidskunst?!, Copenhagen, 2007. 

    11 The exhibition City Space, sited in Copenhagen’s public realm in summer 1996 and involving 24 Danish and international artists, was organized by Anette Østerby and Mikael Andersen. My contribution to the catalogue produced to accompany the exhibition addressed, inter alia, Agneta Werner’s work.

    12 This emerged in a conversation I had with Agneta Werner in February 2009. 

    13 ”The lonesome cowboy journey” was shown for the first time at PIXEL, a video bar organized by Fast Video at the Factory of Art and Design as part of the alternative art fair held in 2006, where Fast Video presented the video compilation “Digital Creatures”.

    14 “the likeness of a gull” shot in 2006, is the lynchpin of the suite of videos entitled “Position of the cycles”. The other videos are from 2007.

     

     

    translation Susan Dew

     

     

     

     

    ”Det tilfældige møde…”

    Agneta Werners fotografiske arbejder

     

     

    METTE SANDBYE

     

    ”Kunst skal være smuk som det tilfældige møde på et dissektionsbord mellem en symaskine og en paraply”. Sådan lød de berømte ord fra forfatteren Comte de Lautréamont eller Isidore Ducasse, som han i virkeligheden hed. Her, i digtsamlingen Maldorors Sange fra 1869, formulerede han et nyt skønhedsideal for kunsten, som senere blev taget op og udødeliggjort af surrealisterne i 1920’ernes Paris. Og tag ikke fejl; det er på ingen måde et romantiserende eller idylliserende skønhedsideal, Lautréamont formulerer i sine digte, der handler om erotik, liv og død. ”Han er smuk som rovfuglekløers sammentrækkelighed..” begynder det vers, der slutter med den berømte sætning. For surrealisterne satte Lautréamont lige netop hovedet på sømmet: hvis man satte forskellige hverdagslige og genkendelige men ikke umiddelbart nære eller relaterede objekter eller indtryk sammen i en form for montage eller collage, så ville sanserne blive aktiveret på en anden måde end den konventionelle og en ny betydning kunne opstå. Død og liv, drøm og mareridt, erotik og hverdagslighed, fantasi og konkret sansning, tilfældighed og kontrol måtte blandes og indgå i hidtil usete konstellationer. Det handlede ikke om at fremstille verdens absurde uforståelighed, men snarere om at pege på nye og hidtil usete muligheder i det virkelige: derfor betegnelsen sur-realisme.

    Nu skal Agneta Werner måske ikke ligefrem kaldes surrealist – mest fordi vi forbinder betegnelsen med en bestemt historisk periode fra 1920’erne til 40’erne. Men nogle af de greb, hun anvender for at fremstille sine værker, minder om surrealisternes. Collagen eller montagen er det overordnede greb i de fleste af hendes arbejder, hvad enten hun lægger et lag af farvet lys over motivet som i ”Elle saigne avec massepain rose” (1985), klipper i fotografiet eller sommetider i negativet, sandwicher det med dele af andre fotografier og ridser direkte i filmens emulsion som i et ligeledes tidligt værk som ”Modus Vivendi” (1987), eller hun sætter ’rene’ og umanipulerede fotografier op ved siden af hinanden som i ”Ladies” (2001) eller tilføjer trykte ord som ”Activity Report. No. anonymous” oven på et fotografi af en halvnøgen kvinde med en baby i armen, som hun gør det i ”fordable” (1994). 

     

    Partiturer i flere medier

    Agneta Werner arbejder både med fotografi, video, tekst, lyd og med forskellige performancelignende strategier. I de fleste af hendes værker indgår der en række delelementer, som hun på lautréamontsk vis sætter sammen på overraskende måder, hvorved noget nyt opstår. Nogle af disse elementer er direkte hentet i noget meget hverdagsligt og genkendeligt: et gammelt familiefotografi, en porcelænsfigur vi måske genkender fra mormors kaminhylde, citroner eller jordbær, et fotografi af en husfacade et sted i provinsen. Andre dele, fornemmer man, er mere iscenesatte, eksempelvis de poserende kvindekroppe. Eller de indgår i en skulpturel eller ’malerisk’ bearbejdning; som draperet stof, snor, farvefiltre, ridsninger, skrift. Men det genkommende træk er, at disse på én gang hverdagsligt genkendelige og sært iscenesatte elementer mixes i ét billede. 

    Man kan også anskue disse collager som kompositioner, der tilbydes betragteren som et partitur, man så selv kan ’afspille’ og forsøge at afkode for betydninger. For betydningen er aldrig givet på forhånd i Werners drømmende, stærkt associationsskabende værker. Der er ingen facitliste, ikke en bestemt fortælling, der skal aflæses. 

    Der er en iøjnefaldende overensstemmelse mellem hendes videoproduktion og fotografierne; fra den eksperimenterende, flertydige udforskning af betydningsrummet mellem billederne og ordene og helt ned i brugen af stærke kontrastfarver, iscenesatte kvinder, fragmenterede kropsdele, stillebenelementer af plast, modellervoks, frugter mm. Også bogmediets sammenstilling af billed- og tekstforløb har hun udforsket og eksperimenteret med i bogen ”Allodium” fra 1991, der fremstår som en udfordrende, grafisk eksperimenterende ’artist’s book’ med tegninger, lyriske eller narrative tekststumper på engelsk, gamle arkivfotos, videostills og iscenesatte fotomontager i farver.

    Arbejdsmåden er for så vidt uændret, hvad enten hun laver video, bogproduktion eller stillfotografi, men her skal det handle om hendes fotografier, der udgør hovedproduktionen i det samlede værk.

     

    Akademitiden

    Agneta Werner er født i 1952 i Malmø, men har boet i Danmark, siden hun i 1979 blev optaget på Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi i København. Hun tog afgang i 1985, men vendte tilbage i 1988-90 for at tage en tillægsoverbygning i kunstformidling. På akademiet begyndte hun som maler. Hurtigt gik hun over til skulpturelle installationer, og denne skulpturelle formbevidsthed slår senere igennem i hendes fotografi. 

    I 1981 skabte hun land-art-projektet ”Spor” i samarbejde med to medstuderende Ewa Jacobsson og Mads Madsen. Sammen lavede de en 4 km lang og 8 cm bred stofstribe i farverne rød, blå, gul og grøn, som de lagde ud dels på en rute gennem byen fra Fælledparken på Østerbro til Frederiksberg Kirkegård, dels placerede på to uvejsomme, ubetrådte ruter i naturen, nemlig langs og på skrænterne ved Stevns Klint og i den sneklædte Gribskov. Kunstnerne stillede indirekte sig selv og de tilfældigt forbipasserende spørgsmålet, om og hvordan de nære omgivelser og den daglige virkelighed transformeres eller måske bare forrykkes let, hvis man placerer en diskret formel ’forstyrrelse’ i dem? Dette performativt-skulpturelle og formelt set meget stramme indbrud i virkelighedens rum blev stoppet af politiet i København mellem Åboulevarden og Rosenørns Allé. Kunstnerne nåede altså ikke at placere stofstriben langs hele den planlagte rute, men det centrale var også snarere den eksperimentelle proces med den formelle forstyrrelse af det hverdagslige rum. De fik i stedet ideen til at afprøve projektet i naturen. Her blev båndet lagt ud som et tidsbegrænset land-art-projekt, der blev fotograferet, hvorefter det blev fjernet igen.

    Agneta Werners første soloudstilling foregik i Kunstakademiets udstillingsrum Rådskælderen året efter. Rummene fremstod ved et hurtigt øjekast tomme, men hurtigt fik man øje på en mængde rumlige ’infiltrationer’ skabt med få, små og simple objekter. Hun havde bl.a. installeret 400 ubemalede tinsoldater i formation, en spyflue i plast på væggen med teksten ’made in Hongkong’ på den ene vinge, to sekskantede søjler, en lille rød, spids trekantsform, der stak ud fra væggen og på gulvet et polaroidfoto af en engleskulptur med en ildflamme under, opstået pga. fotografisk fejleksponering. Det installatoriske montagearbejde med at lade ’paraplyer og symaskiner’ brydes på ’dissektionsborde’ ligger således allerede formuleret her i disse tidlige arbejder, selvom de formelt set er mere skulpturelle og rumligt intervenerende, end hendes senere værker. 

    Få år efter gik hun over til udelukkende at arbejde med fotografi og video i lyrisk-associative montageserier som “Elle saigne avec massepain rose” (1985), “MODUS VIVENDI” (1987), “streaming Deaths” (1987), “IDENTIFICATION” (1988) og de to serier, der også helt ud i titlerne er hendes mest stillebenlignende, “she was still life/reconstructing sense” (1990) og “pretending still life/off Her sense” (1991). Bl.a. i de to sidstnævnte går konkrete elementer tilbage til debutudstillingen igen; tinsoldaterne, farvevalget, inkorporeringen af allerede eksisterende fotografier fra hendes store billedlager, og helt overordnet måden at få flere forskellige objekter og sanseindtryk til at spille med og mod hinanden. I serien ”pretending still life/off Her sense” er billedmontagerne ikke opstået i kraft af en fysisk bearbejdning af materialet i form af klippede og ridsede negativer og fotografier, som ellers var hendes foretrukne arbejdsmetode i de tidlige år. Her har Werner i stedet opbygget tableau’er eller stillebenmotiver på et bord og så fotograferet dem uden manipulation. I tableauerne anvendes andre fotos som baggrund, hvorpå hun har placeret forskellige objekter: en citron, en død, uflået rødspætte, en plasticridder til hest, noget farvepigment i bunker. Herved leger hun med størrelses- og dybdeforhold i fotografiernes drømmeagtige og eventyrlignende landskaber. Og ligesom i de klassiske eventyr, som vi fx kender dem fra Brødrene Grimm, ligger der en urovarslende eller skræmmende tone lige under det tilsyneladende romantisk skønne.

    Titlen ”Elle saigne avec massepain rose” (Hun bløder med lyserød marcipan) er som taget ud af en surrealistisk film fra 1920’erne af Salvador Dali og Luis Bunuel. Her indgår bl.a. et fotografi af en kongelig porcelænsfigur, der forestiller en lille hyrdedreng, et iscenesat fotografi af kunstneren selv iklædt en fin silkebalkjole og bærende på en porcelænsfugl, og et rosatonet fotografi af en kvinde i negligé. Igen er det aldeles op til beskueren at konstruere sin egen surrealistiske ’film’ ud af disse usammenhængende delelementer, der anslår klassiske surrealistiske elementer som begær, kvindelighed, skrøbelighed og drøm. 

     

    Et helt nyt farvefotografi

    Agneta Werners arbejde med fotografiet begyndte egentlig, fordi hun dokumenterede sine installatoriske, tidsbegrænsede værker og udstillinger fotografisk. Pludseligt opdagede hun, at der lå nogle muligheder i sig selv i disse fotografier, som hun fik lyst til at udvikle. I begyndelsen arbejdede hun med, hvad hun selv har kaldt en ’anti-fotografisk holdning’ til fotografiet og til den pænhed og den ærbødighed overfor det tekniske aspekt af mediet, som hun syntes dominerede i den kunstnerisk-fotografiske tradition. Fotografiet måtte manipuleres, destrueres, klippes i, overmales, ridses og gøres til noget fysisk på en måde, der lignede arbejdet med maleriets og skulpturens materialitet. Hen ad vejen fik hun så i højere grad øje for de mere ’fotografiske’ sider af fotografiet såsom dén tomheds- og fraværsfølelse, der ligger i den rene dokumentation, og som hun har udnyttet i sine seneste serier.

    De første år efter akademiet var præget af en frenetisk arbejdsenergi, hvor Agneta Werner på én gang arbejdede med video og fotocollage i gensidig inspiration. I 1985 udstillede hun solo i udstillingsstedet Kongo, i 1987 i Galleri Lång i Malmö og Galleri Basilisk i København og i 1989 i Galleri Monica Benbasat i Norrköping i Sverige. Men det var måske især med hendes deltagelse på Charlottenborgs Efterårsudstilling i 1990, at der for alvor blev lagt mærke til hendes særegne udtryk i det danske kunstliv, hvor ganske få på det tidspunkt arbejdede med farvefotografi i store formater. Her viste hun fire store farvefotografier fra serien “IDENTIFICATION I-VI”. De repræsenterede noget, som man ikke havde set før indenfor dansk fotografi, og selvom billederne umiddelbart var beslægtet med sen-80’ernes internationale strømning af iscenesat fotografi med navne som Barbara Kruger, Boyd Webb, Sandy Skoglund og Cindy Sherman, så var de alligevel noget helt for sig i kraft af deres montagekarakter. I en dansk kontekst markerede de sig alene på grund af formaterne på to gange tre meter, den teknisk ekstremt raffinerede finish og de skinnende, laminerede overflader. De glossy, mættede ilfochromefarver og montagen af forskellige usammenhængende billedfragmenter gav et overvældende og uhåndgribeligt indtryk af drøm og poesi. 

    Ser man nærmere på denne serie, kan man her tydeligt udpege Agneta Werners særlige stiltræk. Brugen af heftige kontrastfarver i det samme billede. Små plast- eller porcelænsfigurer, f.eks. dyr, som på samme tid er kitchet-banale og bringer betragteren tilbage i sine egne erindringsrum, til barneværelset og barndommens eventyr, til mormors stue med porcelænsfigurer. De indsatte kvindelige kropsdele. Disse billeder består ofte af en næsten abstrakt fotografisk baggrund påmonteret mere konkret aflæselige billedfragmenter. Man møder en kvindes øre og hår, afskåret fra resten af kroppen og monteret sammen med et grønligt, sløret baggrundsscenarie. På en blå baggrund i et andet billede fra serien svæver ligeledes et øre og en løsrevet arm – begge røde. Sammen med en knaldrød, sensuel, let åben læbestiftmund minder montagen i dens blanding af sensualitet, uhygge, kitsch og visuel leg og helt ned i de konkrete motiver – mund og afhugget øre - om universet i David Lynch’ film Blue Velvet, der havde haft premiere et par år før. I et tredje ses en fløjtespiller, en barnehånd og et kvindeansigt. Indklippede striber, der ligner blåt boblende vand men faktisk er lavet af fotograferet farvepigment, bryder det ellers komplementærfarvede, rød-grønne baggrundsfotografi. Billedet antyder en fortælling, samtidig med at det i kraft af det urovækkende samspil mellem komplementærfarver og bogstavelig talt løsrevne motivdele fremstår lokkende, sanseligt og smukt. Werner understreger både dybden og fladen på samme tid, bl.a. fordi montageelementerne er så tydeligt og ofte bevidst klodset indklippede, ligesom hun ofte skaber et sensorisk dobbelttydigt sanseindtryk ved at kontrastere farver eller hårde og bløde materialer i de skulpturelle opstillinger, der indgår i mange af fotografierne. 

    “Unknowns” fra 1996 er karakteristisk i den henseende. Det er tre enorme billedfriser, som Agneta Werner udformede som gotiske vinduespartier, der blev placeret på trækonstruktioner foran St. Matthæus kirke i København i anledning af gruppeudstillingen City Space med værker placeret i det offentlige rum i København, der på det tidspunkt var Europæisk Kulturby. Som samlet installation hed værket ”Circumstance for sore eyes.” Inde i kirken var de tre vinduer, der vendte ud mod installationen, blændede. Formatet på de monterede fotografier mimede i forstørret form de rundskårne kirkeruder, som således blev erstattet af disse udendørs placerede bud på en moderne, mere verdslig orienteret vinduesmosaik. Hver frise består af tre fotografier placeret over hinanden. Gnistrende similidiamanter er sat sammen med hvide skumgummiformer og hvidt blondestof, affotograferede religiøse frisemotiver fra et gipsrelief kombineres med plastikperler, farvede vattotter svæver som truende skyer over hårde materialer som en plastæske, metaltråd, et fotografi af en ridder i gips og en gris i plastic; altsammen i Werners genkommende farverepertoire - klar rød, gul, grøn, blå, som i kirkevinduers glasmosaikker.

     

    Meningssammenstød og betydningskæder

    I Werners montager, der også - som nogle af titlerne som nævnt indikerer - kan betragtes som stilleben og derved lægger sig i fri forlængelse af en århundredgammel kunsttradition, samtaler de forskellige elementer på en ikke-narrativ, sanselig og udefinerbar måde. De store formater bemægtiger sig både rummet og betragterens opmærksomhed, men samtidig skubbes man væk fra dem, fordi de ikke er umiddelbart aflæselige. Hun lader desuden sproget være en medskabende faktor, idet billedernes titler og sommetider ord eller sætninger trykt direkte på fotografierne skaber supplerende associationsmuligheder for nye betydningskæder. Ordene er mærkeligt kryptiske og lægger et stemningsleje ind over billedet frem for at give det en egentlig sproglig betydningsforankring: Fra poetisk-visuelle titler som “Elle saigne avec massepain rose” og “lavenderblood” til de titler, der ekkoer en form for teknisk arkivbetegnelse; ”identification” og ”dokumentindsigt”, som hun kalder to serier, eller “Part services. Activity Report, No. anonymous”, som der står henover billederne i serien “royalty”.

    “royalty” (1992-94) består af tre billeder, der er mellem 4 og 6 meter lange. I hvert af dem udspiller der sig et udefinerbart meningssammenstød mellem noget, der ligner et gammelt uskarpt feriefoto, billeder der kunne være filmstills og som på en eller anden måde sætter en fiktiv, filmisk handling i gang hos betragteren, og så nogle reklameskarpt fotograferede enkeltobjekter. I et af de tre, “evoke”, ser man til venstre nogle gule blomster på en glat, blå overflade med en stofblomst imellem. Det kunne lede tankerne i retning af et lig af en kvinde. I midten et kornet feriefoto af en kvinde, der sidder på nogle klipper og ser på fotografen, og i højre side noget lækkert fotograferet stof med et slags arkitekturfotografi oveni. Det private, banale erindringsmateriale, turistbillederne af kvinden, af Eiffeltårnets fod, børnene på stranden og Marcuspladsen i Venedig, kobles til de stramt iscenesatte opstillinger. Det trivielle og det dramatiske, det poetisk fabulerende og en formel strenghed, kitsch og coolness, sættes overalt i spil på samme tid, så man forføres og indtages i billederne og samtidig bliver lettere irriteret over deres mangel på konkret artikuleret fortælling. Agneta Werner bruger lignende strategier og effekter i sine video- og filmproduktioner. Eksempelvis i videoen “Coven, one placement” (1996), hvor man i en langtrukken, ubevægelig optagelse aner tre kameler i et arabisk byrum, som så med mellemrum brydes af lynkorte billedelementer i en anden æstetik og fra et helt andet univers. På lydsiden høres skiftevis en monoton computermusik, arabisk reallyd og en monologisk, usammenhængende fortælling på engelsk af en kvindestemme.

     

    Indicier

    Fra og med serien “dokumentindsigt” (1998) – vist første gang på Gentofte Kunstbibliotek og siden præsenteret på den store soloudstilling Tilfald på Overgaden i København i 1999 - nedtoner Werner de skulpturelle og performative tableauelementer og bearbejdningen af materialet til fordel for en mere ren montage af fotografier, der monteres sideordnet, men som adskilte billeder. Hvor der i nogle af de tidlige stillebenfotografier ophobes og blandes et væld af objekter fra plasticsoldater til rå fisk, mærkelige sætningsfragmenter og farveimpulser, er æstetikken i de nyeste serier anderledes underspillet og stram. I ”dokumentindsigt” sammenstilles flere elementer af fuldkommen betydningstomhed; anonyme fotos fra en kedelig svensk provinsby, der – hjulpet på vej af den retssagslignende titel - pludselig får en slags indiciestatus, som den franske fotograf Atgets pariserfotografier fra begyndelsen af 1900-tallet også kunne have det. I kraft af deres ekstreme skarphed får vi øje på, at der ligger noget smidt i græsset - affald, et stykke tøj eller er det en pose? “Lotsgatan” kan vi lige så tydeligt læse på et lillebitte gadeskilt helt bag i et andet billede. De er sat sammen med bevidst kedelige interieurer med møbler fra 50’erne eller 60’erne; en skammel med brunt, vævet betræk på en brunstribet gulvløber og en åben teaktræslamineret dør, eller igen med disse stramme, formelle stillebenkompositioner som en oval billedramme og to plysbolde i krasse farver på en flad, skrigrød baggrund. Hun kalder også fotografierne for aktsamlinger, og det er netop, som får man et kig ind i nogle sagsakter, der gemmer på en kriminalistisk gåde, som fotografiet alene ikke har nogensomhelst mulighed for at afsløre. Selve ‘sagen’ udfoldes først, når billedet møder sin betragter. De store formater, skarpheden og udnyttelsen af cibachromefotografiets heftigt kontrasterende farver nærmest suger betragteren ind i billederne, men samtidig spiller hun på fotografiets tomhed, og kommer derved til at sige noget essentielt om dets virkemåde mellem nærvær og fravær. 

    Denne indiciestemning fortsættes i serierne ”Ladies” (2001) og ”fra Erindringsbalken” (2004). ”Ladies” er tre fotografier, der hver er sammensat af et portræt af en navngiven kvinde – henholdsvis Gun, Siv og Majken – og et hus. Kvinderne er klædt i mønstret tøj, ofte med blomster, og de er fotograferet på baggrund af et mønstret tapet, hvilket giver portrætterne et farvestrålende og livfuldt udtryk, til trods for at kvinderne ikke smiler. De Sydstatslignende hvide træhuse er placeret mellem eksotiske palmetræer og passer ikke rigtig med de portrætterede kvinders svenske navne. Husene er, i modsætning til kvinderne, set lidt på afstand, de fremstår mennesketomme, og står i det hele taget i en mystisk, filmisk, nærmest lidt uhyggelig kontrast til kvinderne, så man begynder at digte med på sammenhængen mellem kvinde og hus. Kvinderne er fotograferet ved vintertide i naturligt dagslys, så de fremstår ’bløde’ i udtrykket, mens husene er fotograferet i skarpt lys med en lille objektivblænding, hvilket understreger den lidt urovækkende stemning. 

    ”fra Erindringsbalken” er en serie enkeltfotografier, skabt til en udstilling i Politikens forhal i 2004. Værket er karakteristisk for, hvordan Werner arbejder associativt med sine værktitler frem for decideret meningsstyrende. På svensk betegner ordet ’balk’ dels en bærende konstruktion, dels hovedafsnittene i Sveriges Rikes Lag, den svenske grundlov. På gammelt dansk er det et ord for en skillevæg, et markskel eller en bjælke, ligesom det også har været brugt som betegnelse for afsnittene i de gamle nordiske love. Her er altså tale om en form for fremstilling af erindringens grundsubstans eller bærende konstruktion. De stramt og enkelt komponerede fotografier består fortrinsvis af enkeltobjekter placeret på en monokrom baggrund: bl.a. en kagespatel i sølv, et fragment af en guldfarvet cupidoengel, en kniplingsdug, et stykke fed, gul silke. De fremstår som sagligt registrerende museumsfotografier, men i kraft af farvevalget – især skrap rød, gul og blå – og de knivskarpt skildrede overflader i de skinnende stoffer, sølvets spejlende overflade og kniplingens fine filigranmønster opstår der et meget sanseligt sammenstød med den ’coole’ fotograferingsform. 

     

    De flade monokrome overflader, hvorpå Werner har placeret disse ’erindringsobjekter’ er måske det, der kommer nærmest på Lautréamonts dissektionsbord. Symaskinen og paraplyen er her blevet til kagespatel og juleengel, men det iscenesatte ”tilfældige” møde mellem disse materialer, overflader og former artikulerer en særlig skønhed, som både Lautréamont og surrealisterne sikkert ville have nikket anerkendende til.

     

     

     

     

    Illusions have to be offered1

    - om Agneta Werners film- og videoproduktion

     

     

    KRISTINE KERN

     

    ”Narration is never an evident given of images, or the effect of a structure which underlies them; it is a consequence of the visible images themselves, of the perceptible images in themselves, as they are initially defined for themselves”2

    Gilles Deleuze

     

    En særlig poetisk nerve gennemsyrer mange af Agneta Werners værker. Det er som om de enkelte elementer er sammensat på samme måde som ordene i et digt. Werners sprog er blot billedligt. Hun skaber en visuel syntaks, en billedernes fortælling. Det er dog ikke en entydig historie, på samme måde som en nedskrevet fortælling ofte er det. Werners fortællinger er abstrakte og uudgrundelige. Det kan derfor være svært at sætte ord på, hvad de egentlig handler om.

     

    Rejse på tværs af tiden

    Billeder fra forskellige lokaliteter blander sig og transporteres fra den ene projektion til den næste i Agneta Werners videoinstallation ”Tender southern journey.”  Vi er i Stockholm, Berlin og Helsingør; i byrummet og på museum - blandt andet. Asynkrone fortællinger opstår på tværs af på tværs af tid og sted. Nogle elementer er dog gennemgående. Som hesten, der optræder i mange forskellige forklædninger. Lyden er meget dynamisk. Reallyde, klassisk musik og tale i form af voice-over er mikset til et virkningsfuldt sammensurium af den slags, man selv kan opleve, når man bevæger sig rundt i byens rum. Hos Werner er lyden selvfølgelig manipuleret, nogle lyde er forstærket, andre fortrængt, nogle er ”fundet”, andre konstruerede. Samlet set understreger lyden den bevægelse, der ligger i billederne og i deres forskyden sig mellem installationens tre projektioner.

    Oplevelsen er på den ene side meget ’filmisk’ på grund af den måde, videoen er optaget på samt iscenesættelsen i et mørk rum, men samtidig er al lineær, filmisk narratologi suspenderet. Fortællingen fungerer som oftest hos Werner på et associativt niveau, hvor man selv som betragter må stykke fragmenter sammen til en betydning. Samtidig er udstillingskonteksten med til at dreje aflæsningen af værket væk fra en filmisk interpretation. Når det levende billede som i ”Tender southern journey,” forlader biografsalens mørke for at blive en del af en udstilling i dialog med andre værker, indtræder det i en ny relation med beskueren. Man involveres som betragter i en aktiv, processuel udveksling med installationen, idet man bevæger sig i samme rum og således indtræder i en fysisk relation med værkets skulpturelle dimensioner.3

    ”Tender southern journey” blev vist første gang i 2007 på udstillingen Tide i Møstings Hus på Frederiksberg, hvor også videoerne fra installationen ”Position of the cycles” og ”The lonesome cowboy journey” blev udstillet. 

     

    Eksperimenterende afsæt

    Agneta Werners filmiske praksis kan ses som en bevægelse fra eksperimentalfilm til videoinstallation, fra det iscenesatte til det dokumentariske. Lad os vende tilbage til begyndelsen. Dette er en fortælling om Agneta Werners videoværker, set i en blandt flere mulige optikker. Agneta Werner arbejder ikke udelukkende med film og video. Fotografiet indtager en væsentlig plads i hendes praksis, og udgangspunkt var i virkeligheden installation. Det var dengang hun gik på Kunstakademiet i København i begyndelsen af 1980erne. Bevægelsen fra installation til fotografi, film og senere video kom egentlig af en interesse for dokumentationsfotografiet. Når Agneta Werner skulle dokumentere udstillinger som fx den ”Utan titel”, hun i samarbejde med Ewa Jacobsson havde lavet i Galleri (1) i Stockholm 1982, blev hun i stigende grad optaget af selve fotografiet. Dette førte hende til det iscenesatte fotografi, som hun har arbejdet med lige siden.

     

    Kvindebilleder

    På soloudstillingen ”Elle saigne avec masssepain rose”, der i 1985 blev vist i udstillingsstedet Kongo i København, præsenterede Werner en installation, hvor hun for første gang inddrog både fotografi og film. Udstillingen bestod af seks store fotografier, hængt direkte på væggen, to klapstole og en monitor på et rullebord/rack. Fotografierne fremstillede porcelænsfigurer og kvinder iklædt lidt gammeldags, fint festtøj. Lyssætningen i billederne var meget teatralsk med voldsomme slagskygger, og der var brugt farvet lys og filter i de fleste af dem. Eksperimentalfilmen, den 14 minutter lange super 8, ”Warty heaven”, fremstiller en kvinde ved havet. Den er på en gang langsom, næsten dvælende og samtidig flimrende, urolig og inciterende. Werner arbejder med forholdet mellem billede og ord/lyd. Der er på billedsiden et sammenstød mellem kameraets fikserede position og den bevidst abrupte klipning. Ligesom der på lydsiden er divergens mellem voiceover-stemmens rolige tempo og den meget høje, lidt enerverende ringe/pive-lyd, man hører med større eller mindre styrke filmen igennem. Åbningsreplikken lyder ”Oh God, the handsome Prince was expected”, men der er ikke meget eventyr over denne fragmenterede, absurde fortælling. Man ser kvinden i profil og i hel figur, nøgen og drejende sig langsom rundt om sin egen akse. Man ser brændingen, et par kvindefødder i vandkanten. Billedet er rødt. Der er tydeligvis anvendt filter. Man ser havet. Måger på himlen. Sorte grene med flagermus i silhuet mod en natblå baggrund. I slutningen af videoen ser man en hvid svane på det unaturligt rødlige hav. Til sidst forsvinder billedet. Opløser sig i orange ”So it was…”. Manglen på entydighed eller måske bare tydelighed i fortællingen, bevirker et drømmeagtigt univers, hvor erindringsrester kan blande sig på tværs af realitetens grænser. Alligevel er filmen mere struktureret end en drøm. Den samme lidt ubehagelige – det man i Freuds terminologi ville kalde unheimliche – stemning er gennemgående. Ligeså fokuset omkring kvinden – en tematik der i øvrigt udfoldes gennem hele Agneta Werners oeuvre. Måske drejer det sig om en undersøgelse af kvinde-identitet og derigennem fremstillingen af kvindelighed i et offentligt rum som filmens. Her gives ingen entydige svar.

    ”Patricia, the pearl” fra 1988 er Agneta Wernes første video, optaget på U-matic. Tematikken er om muligt endnu mere gådefuld end i ”Warty heaven”. Selv beskriver Werner videoen som ”en visuel fortælling og en monoton stemme, [der] sammen danner et sort transparent hul”4. Alligevel er der udlagt nogle spor. På det indholdsmæssige plan kredser videoen om kvindelig sensibilitet, og formelt er kamerabevægelsen det bærende princip. Hvor ”Warty heaven” anvender fast indstilling, panoreres eller zoomes der uafbrudt i ”Patricia, the pearl”. Til gengæld står de filmede objekter stille. Det er en opstilling af forskellige genstande på et bord med en super8 film og en diasprojektion i baggrunden. Selvom ”Patricia, the pearl” er en video, har den altså i høj grad eksperimentalfilmens karakter. Den er afprøvende og søgende i sit formsprog, surreal i sit indhold. Hvis man ser på, hvad Agneta Werner ellers lavede omkring dette tidspunkt, er der en tydelig forbindelse til fotoserier som ”Modus Vivendi, sonett i elva akter” og ”streaming Deaths” fra 1987 og ”IDENTIFICATION I – VI” fra 1988. Også i disse serier arbejdes med det fragmenterede og collageagtige, også her finder vi kvinden som gennemgående figur.

    I Skuelysten og den fortællende film fra 1973 opstiller filmteoretikeren og feministen Laura Mulvey et psykoanalytisk scenarium for aflæsningen af film. Hendes fokus er, hvordan kvinden bliver fremstillet som passiv rollemodel i den klassiske Hollywoodfilm. Hun skriver bl.a.:

     

    ”I en verden som bygger på manglende balance mellem kønnene, er skuelysten blevet splittet mellem aktiv/mandlig og passiv/kvindelig. Det beslutsomme mandlige blik projicerer sin fantasi over på den kvindelige figur, som er formgivet i overensstemmelse hermed. I deres traditionelle, ekshibitionistiske rolle bliver kvinder på samme tid beskuet og udstillet, med et udseende som er kodet til at have en så stærk visuel og erotisk virkning, at de kan siges at signalere to-be-looked-at-ness”.5

     

    Denne problematik, som Mulvey beskriver i forhold til Hollywood-filmen, er hos Agneta Werner dekonstrueret. Her fremstilles kvinden fragmentarisk, nøgternt eller iscenesat, men på intet tidspunkt indtager hun en helstøbt, stereotyp kvinderolle, som den Hollywood ofte producerer. Her er derimod tale om et kvindeligt blik, et perspektiv der udfoldes endnu mere tydeligt i Werners videoer omkring 1990.

     

    Det performative

    Både ”Warty heaven” og ”Patricia, the pearl” er mørke fortællinger. I slutningen af 80erne bliver farveholdningen lysere med den 22 minutter lange ”Goats of glory” fra 1989. Her ser man på skift fire forskellige kvinder i et næsten hvidt rum. Nogle gange er de nøgne, andre gange har de tøj på. Man ser dem i helbillede og i close-up. Som fragmenterede udsnit af en større fortælling fungerer disse nærbilleder som henvisninger, men samtidig har de selvgyldig værdi: De er billeder, der i sig selv fortæller en historie på samme måde som et surrealistisk maleri gør det. Det absurde, manipulerede og konstruerede i fortællingen, understreges af, at videobilledet ind i mellem er manipuleret, så det nærmer sig et malerisk udtryk. Collage, cut-up, og korte indklippede sekvenser er alt sammen greb Werner benytter i denne video, og som understreger dens karakter af eksperimentalfilm. Samtidig er der også henvisninger til klassisk ægyptisk og græsk kunst, ligesom der er mere generelle kunsthistoriske henvisninger i for eksempel den måde nogle af scenerierne er iscenesat som ’nature morte’. Igen kan man drage en parallel til Agneta Werners fotografiske arbejder i samme tidsrum. Fotoserierne ”she was still life/reconstructing sense” og ”pretending still life/off Her sense” fra henholdsvis 1990 og 91, har samme karakter af iscenesat opstilling 

    - som titlerne også angiver det. Begge værker er eksperimenterende i deres udtryk. Hvor ”she was still life/reconstructing sense” ligesom ”Goats of glory” anvender en sammenskrivning af forskellige formelle greb, er ”pretending still life/off Her sense” mere collageagtig. I de to førstnævnte er kvindefiguren desuden et centralt element.

    ”Goats of glory” kan da også ses som en yderligere eksponering af temaet omkring kvindelig identitet, der også ligger i ”Warty heaven” og ”Patricia, the pearl”. Hvor de to foregående repræsenterede modsatrettede strategier, stillbillede vs. bevægelig figur og opstilling versus panorerende kamera, anvender ”Goats of glory” begge disse strategier. Samtidig involverer den også performance og får således karakter af dokumentation af en faktisk hændelse. Der er dog på ingen måde tale om en dokumentarvideo, men det at ”handlingen” fremstår som ageren, understreger det konstruerende i situationen, eller rettere repræsentationen af kvinden som en konstruktion. I denne forbindelse er det nærliggende at pege på den amerikanske litteraturteoretiker Judith Butlers kønsbegreb, som hun fremstiller det i bogen Gender Trouble fra 1990. Butler gør her op med den begrænsede mening af begrebet ’køn’ som enten maskulint eller feminint. Hos hende er kønnet performativt, dvs. at det vedblivende må konstituere sig selv som (køns-)identitet via handlinger og sociale udvekslinger inden for de givne kulturelle rammer. Og det er på en måde hvad kvinderne i flere af Agneta Werners videoer – specielt ”Goats of glory” – gør. De afprøver forskellige, ofte overdrevne versioner af den stereotype kvinderolle, undersøger den via en performativ ’sætten sig selv’ i kvindens sted.

     

    Cut up

    ”Courier”, et samarbejde med forfatteren Christer Hermansson, og ”Ohh!, so…,” begge videoer fra 1990, har flere ting til fælles, ligesom de også både formelt og indholdsmæssigt viser tilbage til Agneta Werners andre film- og videoværker. De forenkler og radikaliserer flere af de formelle greb, vi tidligere har set. I ”Courier” er billedet tværdelt. I midten løber et bånd med tekst, en historie, som gennemskærer billedet. På hver side ser man profilen af et ansigt mod en blå baggrund - ikke hele ansigtet, kun lige næse, mund og hage. De to ansigter (faktisk er der tale om to optagelser af det samme ansigt) ligger vandret, vendt mod hinanden, men hver sin vej. Ansigterne bevæger munden på skift, meget langsomt som i slowmotion. Ind imellem klippes til korte sort/hvide sekvenser med væddeløbsheste. Så udskiftes ansigterne med billeder af et nøgent bryst for oven og en opadpegende finger nedenfor tekstbåndet. Musikken ændrer sig fra monotomt, sitrende elektro til et mere pågående, insisterende lydbillede. Forløbet gentager sig, men mod slutningen ser man også gennem et orange filter to meget korte sekvenser med en liggende, nøgen kvinde, og en pivelyd afbryder for en kort stund musikken/lyden. Der er ingen åbenbar sammenhæng mellem den historie om en (narkotika?)-kurér6, der fortælles i tekst-båndet og videoens billeder. Forbindelsen er bevidst associativ. 

    Fra et formelt synspunkt minder ”Ohh!, so…”en del om ”Courier”, blot er fortællingen mindre tydelig. Der krydsklippes hele tiden mellem panoreringer gennem et mørkt, collageagtigt tableau med ensomme menneskefigurer i et iscenesat, landskabslignende miljø akkompagneret af lyden af rullende bølger, og så et mere stramt arrangement af tre hænder eller to hænder og en fod, lagt som tre bevægelige striber mod hver sin farvede baggrund på langs af billedplanet. Hen over disse billeder kører med mellemrum forskellige lyd-ord som ”aef”, ”cii”, ”hva” og ”uhx”, og man hører en repetativ, elektronisk komposition lidt som den i ”Courier”. Videoen er urealistisk som en drøm, og det er ikke helt til at sige, hvad det egentlig drejer sig om. Selv skriver Agneta Werner at den skal ”imødekomme mellemrummet”.7 Fælles for både ”Courier” og ”Ohh!, so...” er en interesse for arbitrære forbindelser. De kan ses som en slags eksperimenter, som undersøgelser af hvad der sker i sammenstillingen af billede, tekst og lyd. De abrupte klip, det collageagtige og koblingen af uegale elementer er alt sammen formelle greb, der understreger videoerne som undersøgelser af betydningsdannelsen.

    Bogen ”Allodium, she belonged to him” fra 19918, er også præget af cut up-teknikkens flimrende univers. Fotografier, tegninger og tekstfragmenter væver sig sammen til en asynkron, fragmentarisk fortælling uden entydig pointe. Den er dog struktureret i et forløb fra kunstnerens side. Hun har udlagt nogle associative spor, et landskab af tekstuelle og visuelle forbindelser, som læseren kan navigere i. ”Allodium” kan formelt og indholdsmæssigt ses som en opsamling af Agneta Werners værker fra midten af 1980erne til begyndelsen af 90erne: Den er præget af samme lidt tørre sanselighed og udfolder desuden flere af de greb, vi har set i både videoer og i fotografiet – nu i bogobjektets format. ”Allodium” skulle desuden vise sig at markere et skift i kunstnerens produktion.

     

    Virklighedens genkomst

    Hvor Agnetas film og videoer fra midten af 1980erne og til 1990 i høj grad har været iscenesatte, sker der i midten af 1990erne et markant skift. ”Coven, one placement” fra 1996 er – selv om den trækker tråde tilbage til ”Warty heaven” – langt mere dokumentarisk i sit udtryk. I langsomt tempo panoreres hen over nogle arabisk udseende tage. De står som mørke silhuetter mod den nedgående sol. Billederne, der akkompagneres af bylyde, stille, arabisk musik mm., fungerer som en slags åbningsscene til et visuelt epos i fire dele, ligesom de også afslutter fortællingen; de fungerer som ramme ved at angive videoens stemning og tempo. Den gennemgående billedsekvens i alle fire dele er silhuetterne af tre kameler i modlys – igen mod en solrød himmel. Musikken ændrer sig men ikke radikalt, og de meditative toner giver plads til naturens lyde samt sætningsfragmenter i form af voice-over, som kunstneren har indtalt. Talen fylder – ligesom den indklippede tekst, der adskiller videoens forskellige afsnit – billederne med et tvetydigt indhold; man aner konturerne af en fortælling, en subtil relation, men forstår aldrig helt hvad der foregår. Fornemmelsen af uforudsigelig dobbelttydighed understreges af indklip af sort/hvide billeder, som virker foruroligende i kraft af den skærende kontrast til videoens langsomme tempo. Disse billeder er nærbilleder af fx et udsnit af en gade eller grenen fra en plante. Æstetikken er anderledes, mere kornet, og det kunne virke som var de optaget i smug. I det hele taget er der noget skæbnesvangert, en underliggende stemning af utryghed over videoen; et indtryk som kun forstærkes af det langtrukne, nærmest enerverende tempo.

    Videoens karakter af dokumentation er et vigtigt indholdsbærende element. Agneta Werner har ikke søgt at lave en dokumentarfilm, men det, at hun i sin video henviser til en dokumentarfilm-tradition, har betydning for aflæsningen af værket. Formen bliver vigtig for værkets indhold, fordi de forestillinger om sandhed og objektivitet, der traditionelt ”klæber” til dokumentarfilmen, overføres til videoen i form af henvisningen til dokumentargenren.  Den dokumentariske form kan hermed forstås som et selvrefleksivt greb, hvormed værket synliggør sin egen form som konstrueret repræsentation.10

    ”Coven, one placement” var oprindelig produceret til skulpturudstillingen City Space11 som en del af Werners bidrag, ”Circumstance for sore eyes”. Dette var installeret ved Matthæus Kirke på Vesterbro i København. Desværre blev kun den ene del af projektet, de store, billboardagtige fotografier, ”Unknowns” opstillet uden for kirken, mens videoen aldrig blev realiseret. Den var tænkt til at blive vist på en monitor i selve kirkerummet, mellem prædikestolen og alteret. Således skulle projektet samlet set ikke blot have aktivet rummet omkring kirken, men også det indre kirkerum. Første gang ”Coven, one placement” blev vist, var som en del af udstillingen Tilfald på Overgaden i 1999. Det var en udstilling med det vist retrospektivt præg, idet den greb tilbage i kunstnerens oeuvre og fremdrog ældre værker i sammenhæng med nyere. På udstillingen vistes fx fotoserien ”royalty” fra 1992 – 94 første gang samlet. Dette have ikke tidligere været muligt på grund af de store formater (det største af seriens tre billeder er næsten seks meter langt) og samtidig gik den fint i spænd med den nye serie ”dokumentindsigt” fra 1998.

    Projektet ”Circumstance for sore eyes,” hvortil ”Coven, one placement” altså oprindelig var produceret, peger frem mod et nyt aspekt af Agneta Werners kunst, der til trods for at det hele tiden har været til stede som underliggende tema, nu udfoldes i en mere markant form/fremtrædelse. Det drejer sig om at medtænke værkernes specifikke, installatoriske iscenesættelse – nogle gange allerede i tilblivelsesprocessen.

     

    Post-produktion

    Efter ”Coven, one placement” går der en årrække, hvor Agneta Werner hverken producerer film- eller videoværker. Fra denne periode er til gengæld fotoserierne ”dokumentindsigt,” den monumentale ”Ladies” (2001) og ”fra Erindringsbalken” (2004). Da Werner igen i 2002 optager arbejdet med video, er det i digitalt format. Det første digitale videoværk er den uprætentiøse ”The lonesome cowboy journey” fra 2006, som er optaget i Dyrehaven ved København. Man ser en kvinde på en hest, følger hende, mens hun langsomt rider ud af billedet. Videoen er meget anderledes end Agneta Werners tidligere værker, fordi den fremstår så ubearbejdet. Her er ikke manipuleret med noget. Den seks minutter lange sekvens er ikke engang klippet. Blot flyttes kameraet lidt ind imellem for at kunne fastholde den ridende kvinde i billedet. Lyden, en kort, frisk ’cowboy-melodi’, et par skud og nogle ’dyrelyde’ er det eneste som er tilføjet de dokumentariske optagelser. Det er imidlertid lyd og titel, der understreger kunstnerens intention med værket. Uden disse betydningsindikatorer ville det blot fremstå som et tilfældigt, dokumentarisk fragment. Både titel og lyd markerer cowboy-vinklen og hermed at værket fremstiller en kvinde i en rolle, som traditionelt er forbeholdt mænd: Nemlig den ensomt ridende cowboy, der i enhver cowboyfilm med respekt for sig selv til slut – efter veludført heltegerning – rider ud mod horisonten og dermed ud af filmbilledet. Til forskel fra Werners tidligere videoer, er der altså her ikke tale om en undersøgelse af forskellige stereotype kvinderoller, men derimod om aktivt at indsætte en kvinde i en manderolle. Til gengæld er der et andet element, som meget tydeligt forbinder værket til flere af tidligere ting, nemlig hesten. Ved nærmere eftersyn optræder der heste i en del af Agneta Werners videoer, således i ”Patricia, the pearl” (i voice-overen), ”Goats of glory”, ”Courier” og ikke mindst ”Tender southern journey”. 

    ”The lonesome cowboy journey” er meget betegnende for Agneta Werners måde at arbejde på. Da hun optog videoen, var hun egentlig taget i Dyrehaven ved Klampenborg for at filme hjorte, men opdagede undervejs et langt mere interessant motiv: den ridende kvinde.12 Videoen er altså en form for funden materiale, en tilfældig optagelse, som efterfølende er bearbejdet. Sådan er det tit. Karakteristisk for Werners arbejdsmetode er, at hun ofte starter med et fragment og herefter prøver sig frem, lægger til og trækker fra. Hun sætter med egne ord tingene op over for hinanden for at se, hvad der så sker, og ved ikke på forhånd hvor det skal ende. Det er i efterbearbejdningen betydningerne opstår. 

    I 2007 var ”The lonesome cowboy journey”13 en del af den store videoinstallations udstilling Tide, som Agneta Werner havde i Møstings Hus på Frederiksberg i slutningen af 2007. Dette var imidlertid ikke første gang hun arbejdede med stort anlagte videoinstallationer. 

     

    Mod det installatoriske

    De nye videoværker fra de senere år er meget anderledes end de fra 1980erne og begyndelsen af 90erne. Videoerne tænkes nu – i endnu højere grad end tidligere - ind i en installatorisk ramme, hvor udstillingsrummet bliver en aktiv medspiller. Et godt eksempel er installationen ”Position of the cycles” fra 2007, som blev lavet specielt til Århus Kunstbygnings ottekantede rum i forbindelse med udstillingen Navigation. Værket består af fire videoer vist på fladskærme, indsat i hver sin væg. Således blev der vist en video på hver anden af rummets vægge. I midten af rummet var fire bænke. De var specielt designet til udstillingen og konstrueret i forhold til rummets diagonaler og videoskærmenes dimensioner. Hver bænk havde front mod en af videoerne. Ved siden af hver skærm hang et sæt høretelefoner. På denne indirekte måde blev beskueren inviteret til at fordybe sig i installationens enkelte dele, samtidig med at man selvfølgelig også kunne se den i sin helhed, se de korrespondancer, der opstod videoerne imellem.

    ”Position of the cycles” bestod som nævnt af fire videoer: ”the likeness of a gull”, ”countryside life”, ”access to history” og ”presentation of a witness”. Fælles for dem er, at de alle er meditative, nærmest ”kedelige”. Hver video fremstiller et eller flere dyr i korte, dokumentariske sekvenser filmet med fast kameraindstilling. I ”the likeness of a gull” følger man således en måge, som sidder på en pæl i vandet. Filmen slutter, da mågen flyver14. I ”presentation of a witness” er det en blishøne man betragter og i ”countryside life” en hest, der ligger og dovner på marken, mens den sidste af videoerne, ”access to history” fremstiller nogle blomsterfluer i en hybenrose. Sidstnævnte afspilles i slowmotion, men den langsommelighed, der ekspliciteres her, er egentlig karakteristisk for alle videoerne. Selv om billederne bevæger sig, og ’handlingen’ i en vis forstand skrider fremad, er det som om tiden er standset i et evigt, fastfrosset nu. Der er ingen narrativ progression. På den måde minder videoerne faktisk om maleri, hvilket også understreges af iscenesættelsen, hvor de hænger som malerier på væggen med tilhørende bænk beregnet for kontemplativ fordybelse. Samlet set forholder de fire videoer, der udgør ”Position of the cycles”, sig selvfølgelig til udstillingens overordnede tematik omkring navigation. Men de gør det på et ret abstrakt og mere alment plan, hvor navigation også bliver en metafor for tilstedeværelse i verden – slet og ret.

    Agneta Werner har igen bevæget sig i retning af det installatoriske og det dokumentariske samtidig med, at hun spiller på ikke at leve op til traditionelle filmiske konventioner. Det formelt eksperimenterende er stadig et væsentligt element i hendes praksis, ligesom det - man i mangel af et mere adækvat begreb - kunne kalde det eksistentielle. Sidstnævnte får ofte form af bestemte, gennemgående figurer, der kan identificeres allerede tidligt i Werners oeuvre, og som vedholdende spiller med – hesten og kvinden er i denne sammenhæng de to helt centrale. Sammen med videoinstallationen ”Tender southern journey” ligeledes fra 2007 udstikker ”Position of the cycles” således en ny kurs for Agneta Werners kunstneriske diskurs. 

     

     

     

    NOTER:

    1 Dette er slutreplikken fra videoen ”Patricia, the pearl”, 1988

    2 Gilles Deleuze: Cinema 2. The Time-Image, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 1989, s. 27

    3 Se endvidere min tekst ”Mellem Billede og Bevægelse – om videokunst i udstillingssammenhæng” i Ramsing, M., (red.), Dwellan, Charlottenborg Udstillingsbygning, København 2004

    4 Citatet stammer fra kunstnerens Værkfortegnelse

    5 Laura Mulvey: ”Skuelysten og den fortællende film” i Steen Salomonsen m.fl. (red.): Tryllelygten. Tidsskrift for levende billeder, nr.1, København 1991, s. 74

    6 Termen ’Courier’, der også kan betyde guide, hentyder samtidig til fortælleren, der ’guider’ os igennem historien.

    7 I Agneta Werners værkfortegnelse hedder det: ”Et logisk udskifte af tegn, tid og tålmodighed, for at imødekomme mellemrummet. Et eksperimenterende arbejde med billede og lyd.”

    8 ”Allodium” var Agneta Werners afgangsprojekt fra Kunstpædagogisk Afdeling på Kunstakademiet i København.

    9 Ovenstående beskrivelse af ”Coven, one placement” er en lettere omskrevet version af den tekst jeg lavede til udstillingen Tilfald på Overgaden i 1998, hvor videoen, der oprindelig var produceret til City Space i 1996, blev vist for første gang.

    10 Se min artikel ”Realitetsrepræsentationer – en undersøgelse af dokumentarisme i billedkunst” i Periskop nr. 13, Samtidskunst?!, København 2007.

    11 Udstillingen City Space med 24 danske og internationale kunstnere var organiseret af Anette Østerby og Mikael Andersen. Den fandt sted i det københavnske byrum i sommeren 1996. Der blev udgivet et katalog i forbindelse med udstillingen, hvor jeg bl.a. har skrevet om Agneta Werner.

    12 Dette fremgik af en samtale med Agneta Werner, jeg havde i februar 2009

    13 ”The lonesome cowboy journey” blev udstillet første gang på PIXEL, et video-bar arrangeret af Fast Video på Fabrikken for Kunst og Design i forbindelse med den alternative kunstmesse i 2006. Her præsenterede Fast Video, video-combilationen Digital Ceatures.

     

    14 ”the likeness of a gull,” der er optaget i 2006, danner grundlaget for hele den værkcyklus, der tilsammen danner ”Position of the cycles.” De øvrige videoer er fra 2007.

    hommage rendu à l'héritage du passé, 2015, art-post-card
    hommage rendu à l'héritage du passé, 2015, art-post-card
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    hidden Substance, 2015, installation, Malmö, Sweden
    the portrait of Her likeness, 2015, unique copy
    detail, the portrait of Her likeness, 2015, unique copy
    detail, the portrait of Her likeness, 2015, unique copy
    detail Mademoiselle, 2013, installation, 4 min videoloop
    detail, the portrait of Her likeness, 2015, unique copy
    detail, the portrait of Her likeness, 2015, unique copy
    detail, the portrait of Her likeness, 2015, unique copy
    detail, the portrait of Her likeness, 2015, unique copy
    detail, the portrait of Her likeness, 2015, unique copy
    the Allodium refresh, 2014, unique copy, artist book
    detail the Allodium refresh, 2014, unique copy
    detail, the Allodium refresh, 2014
    detail, the Allodium refresh, 2014, unique copy
    detail, the Allodium refresh, 2014, unique copy
    pp.22-23, the Allodium refresh, 2014, unique copy
    the Allodium refresh, 2014, in the Library
    the Caramella fugitives, 2014, installation
    the Caramella fugitives, 2014, installation
    the Caramella fugitives, 2014, installation
    the Caramella fugitives, 2014, installation
    exhibition view, FELLOW TRAVELLER, 2013
    exhibition view, FELLOW TRAVELLER, 2013
    exhibition view, FELLOW TRAVELLER, 2013
    exhibition view, FELLOW TRAVELLER, 2013
    exhibition view, FELLOW TRAVELLER, 2013
    Reflecting shift, 2013, sound installation
    Reflecting shift, 2013, sound installation
    detail Reflecting shift, 2013, sound installation
    detail the exhibition FELLOW TRAVELLER, 2013
    detail the exhibition FELLOW TRAVELLER, 2013
    Mademoiselle, 2013, videoinstallation
    Mademoiselle, 2013, videoinstallation
    Mademoiselle, 2013, videoinstallation
    Mademoiselle, 2013, videoinstallation
    Mademoiselle, 2013, videoinstallation
    Mademoiselle, 2013, videoinstallation
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    Caramella, 2013, video film
    La vie dans la fontaine, 2013, 6min. 56sec. SD, stereo
    La vie dans la fontaine, 2013, 6min. 56sec. SD, stereo
    La vie dans la fontaine, 2013, 6min. 56sec. SD, stereo
    La vie dans la fontaine, 2013, 6min. 56sec. SD, stereo
    La vie dans la fontaine, 2013, 6min. 56sec. SD, stereo
    La vie dans la fontaine, 2013, 6min. 56sec. SD, stereo
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #5
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #6
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #8
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #9
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #10
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #11
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #14
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #15
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #16
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #27
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #30
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #35
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #36
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #43
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #46
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #47
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #58
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #59
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #60
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #61
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #62
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #67
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #68
    Seven o´clock sharp, 2013, dias installation, #73
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Tender southern journey, 2007, 18min. SD 3x5:4, stereo
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    Position of the cycles, 2007, video installation
    view from the exhibition Tilfald [Forefall], 1999
    view from the exhibition Tilfald [Forefall], 1999
    view from the exhibition Tilfald [Forefall], 1999
    view from the exhibition Tilfald [Forefall], 1999
    view from the exhibition Tilfald [Forefall], 1999
    view from the exhibition Tilfald [Forefall], 1999
    view from the exhibition Tilfald [Forefall], 1999
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Coven, one placement, 1996, 28 min. betacam, stereo
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, A4, 500 copies
    Allodium, 1991, Charlottenborg Exhibition Hall
    Allodium, 1991, Charlottenborg Exhibition Hall
    Allodium, 1991, Charlottenborg Exhibition Hall
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.7
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.10
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.16
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.17
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.20
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.23
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.25
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.27
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.29
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.30
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.31
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.32
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.33
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.36
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.37
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.40
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.45
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.46
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.47
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.49
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.52
    Allodium, 1991, artist book, p.53